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Mazda makes this 10 worst list 3x! Don't shoot me, I am just the messenger!

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Mazda makes this 10 worst list 3x! Don't shoot me, I am just the messenger!

  #1  
Old 01-20-2014, 09:30 AM
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Default Mazda makes this 10 worst list 3x! Don't shoot me, I am just the messenger!

Yahoo!
 
  #2  
Old 01-20-2014, 09:53 AM
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Well this should stir up pot even more. CX-7 is worst on list. Followed a couple links and came across this quickly: ClickMe

The CX-7 began production in 2007. Within a few years, reports of timing chains surfaced caused by the VVT (Variable Valve Timing) module.

In 2011, Mazda release a Special Service Program (SSP). Although, this program was meant to assist consumers with reimbursments, it has further alienated owners and has shown Mazda's true colors in assisting their loyal buyers.

There are several other issues with these crossovers that we would love to hear about.

Please email those directly to me at jamie (dot) hurley (at) gmail.com.

Our goal is to collect owner information of those interested in pursuing a class-action lawsuit against Mazda North America. We feel there is enough scorned owners in regards to timing chain and turbo issues that we can effectively collect a settlement and/or reimbursement for consumers.

Once enough signatures are collected; emails addresses and contact information will be forwarded to a list of class-action attorneys in order to secure interest and begin proceedings. Cx7Problems.com will be in contact with each owner, via email, every step of the process.

That sounds like serious expensive LEMON issues. Oh I just saw you made a thread on this!!!! https://www.mazdaforum.com/forum/maz...-issues-32971/

I can understand the Millenia with Turbo and solenoids very tricky stuff to figure out.
The Mazda 626 automatic---must be transmissions. I myself can't stand my automatic tranny as it blew with only 20,000 miles so after it was replaced i put on an external cooler and synthetic tranny fluid!
 

Last edited by UseYourNoggin; 01-20-2014 at 09:59 AM.
  #3  
Old 01-20-2014, 04:23 PM
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Yes, the 626 had a version of the CD4E.
You can tear it down in half an hour, after several years of practice I presume.
 
  #4  
Old 01-20-2014, 04:58 PM
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Originally Posted by tanprotege View Post
Yes, the 626 had a version of the CD4E.
You can tear it down in half an hour, after several years of practice I presume.
But it probably takes 4 hours to remove it first from the car!
 
  #5  
Old 01-20-2014, 05:35 PM
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I believe longer than 4 hours. In the Ford Contour you need to drop the subframe!
 
  #6  
Old 01-21-2014, 06:28 AM
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Neither of the first two Mazda's on the list surprise me. And the CX-7 is turbocharged and has many of the same issues the early Mazdaspeed 3's had. But I believe most of these have been solved by the aftermarket by now, including better turbo seals.

The late 626's, from about 97 IIRC, did have that awful transmission. And I personally would steer anyone away from taking on a Millenia too, especially now that they are 15 yrs old.
Maybe I'm short-sighted, I'm not sure, but it seems to me that in the interest of safety and economy of fuel mileage and manufacture, that no modern car will become a classic.
We live in a throw-away society, worse than ever before and our cars have become some of the biggest throw-aways we will own in our lifetimes.
I grew up respecting things that were made to last, antiques if you will, but few our children have respect for such things. They have no basis to in many cases. Everything they own, or will own has been engineered with a life expectancy, and repairs are largely out of the question due to unavailable prioritized parts, the cost of parts and labor, or simply laziness. What was new 10 years ago have no new parts available to repair them, or are so expensive it's cheaper to replace it with new.
Things built to last are things of the past, which personally I feel is a shame. As a society, and as a race, we should hang our heads that greed has come so far.
/rant.
 
  #7  
Old 01-21-2014, 09:44 AM
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Virgin 1: I agree with you at least 85% on your sentiment. I can observe my own boys and the freshmen students at work and see much of what you bemoan. The other 15% are exemptions of the rule. There are young people who dislike the throw away attitude. Also often they don't have money and are forced to fix what they have, just as I had to when I was their age. That taught me and that will teach them to appreciate what they have.

There are cars that will be collectible. Maybe not classic, but collectible. You can guess which one they are. I predict it will be the ones the kids developed an emotional connection with. For example Subaru: If you grow up in a family that made back country trips taking the dogs along you will have a trove fond memories connected to that vehicle......but it won't be a 57 Chevy.
 
  #8  
Old 01-21-2014, 06:52 PM
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AH!! MY FIRST CAR.... a 57 Chevy!!!
I knew what I wanted and I went for it when I was 15. It helped that my grandparents had left me a little (very little) money, but I do have them to thank for that memory. Wish I still had it/one.
For the record, that car cost me $400 in 1973. Try getting a '57 in running order for that today!! LOLOLOLOL!!! I dumped a rebuilt 300/327 in it shortly after for $125... which was a bargain even then.

Yes, I know there are those that will still appreciate good quality and things that have survived, but they seem to be getting fewer and further between as we slip further and further into complacency with 'what is' instead of what should be.
 

Last edited by virgin1; 01-21-2014 at 06:55 PM.
  #9  
Old 01-21-2014, 07:41 PM
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You are as old as my younger brother. Growing up in Germany we did not get a driver's license for cars until the age of 18. But we got a license for mopeds at 16. I did not fall in love with Chevy's; we did not have them! We had Opel, German made Ford and VW. Add lots of European imports from France and Italy, Sweden and the occasional English one.
My younger brother found a early 70's Opel Record 2-door station wagon. As you know, Opel was the German GM brand and they had a lot of similarity with the Chevy II. I remember a trip to Paris with it, sleeping in the back of the car to save money...

I fell in love with the BMW 2002ti. Of course I couldn't afford one. I had VW beetles and every time I see one I remember why I wouldn't want another one: At 60000 miles the exhaust valve of the 3rd cylinder was liable to drop out and kill the engine, the drum brakes were horrible, the engine noise unbearable and when the heat smelled like exhaust you needed to buy expensive new heat exchangers. But I learned a lot about cars!
 
  #10  
Old 01-21-2014, 09:26 PM
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I'm as old as my younger brother? That's a strange way to put it, but I will say that that Chevy and I were the same age. LOL

Although I've never been to Europe, it seems we share a similar automotive history. See I grew up in a very small town in Pennsylvania where there were two different faction of gearheads: Across the street from my house is where the American muscle car guys hung out. Most were older than I, but they accepted me as part of the group. They were the kind of guys that would blow up and engine, or blow out a rear axle, go to the local junkyard, buy anther one and install it. They were most often bigger American cars which had the power, but usually didn't handle worth a damn.

Up the street was a progressive family of four boys, the youngest being my best friend. They appreciated smaller more efficient cars that gave up a little power for handling. If one of their cars needed fixing, they'd take it apart and figure out what the problem was and learn how to fix it. Being who I am, and that I had a lot of respect for these boys, I found their ways were the better way and without losing my passion for American power, began to see the advantage of efficient cars that handled better. That's the background.

After my Chevy, my third car was a '67 Opel Kadett Rallye, 1.1L, twin Solex carbs and about 45hp on a good day.
Fast forward to 1979 and I found myself working at a small independent 'foreign' shop where everything from VW's to Jaguars were our daily bread. We had Bug-eye (Frog-eye for the British) Sprites, MG's and Triumph's, Volvo's and Jaguars, Mercedes and Mazda's, until we finally decided to specialize in BMW and Volvo's.
By this time I was driving an '63 MGB, and a '65 Volvo 1800S. I road rallied a modified Volvo 144S, and later an '80 Honda Civic hatchback, which needed surprisingly little to be competitive as a club racer.
I became the Parts Manager later on and we worked almost exclusively on Volvo 120/140/160 series cars and BMW 1600/2002's. I know those cars like the back of my own hand.
Hope you get a kick out of this read.
 

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